Monthly Archives: June 2012

Eight Do’s and One Don’t About Report Cards…not in any particular order


(1) Don’t wait until the last minute to write them.  I always think I can do report cards in 7 – 10 days; that just doesn’t work.  I need to give myself at least 3 weeks because there is always some other end-of-year task that needs to get done immediately after report cards are due, and because writing report cards isn’t just about assigning marks or writing comments.  There is a lot more prep work that needs to be done before getting to that point.


(2) Do take about a week  to 10 days to gather evidence.  Read over notes from one-on-one conferences, review student work, anecdotes, and recordings of conversations, etc.  Then, jot down what I notice in terms of trends, work habits, use of strategies, and other important observations that I can use to write comments.


(3) Do try to start each comment with something positive that a child has done or said.  I have a colleague who will often quote children in her report card comments to support her own assessment of a child’s academic and/or social progress.


(4) Do enjoy the process of revisiting my students’ work for the term.  I found myself lingering over certain pieces of work and picturing my students doing that work in class.  In some cases, I was able to visualize students as they engaged in a particular project; this allowed me to remember things that I had forgotten.


(5) Do make a point of taking the time to stand back and observe children at work throughout the year.  And, make sure I have a clipboard or a notebook to jot down what I see.  This will help me back up my comments with concrete examples.


(6) Although I don’t do this in order to aid in report card writing, do ask children to write or say one thing that they have learned at the end of each unit of study with this purpose in mind.  This will help when writing comments and can provide insights into a child’s metacognitive awareness.  I can also see this spurring further conversation if a child’s comments surprise or perplex me.


(7) Whenever possible, do ask a colleague to read my comments.  Sometimes I sense I’ve said something that doesn’t sound right but I’m stumped as to how to rephrase it in a manner that parents can hear and understand.


(8) Do use allotted release time during the day to work on report cards.  I have usually not taken advantage of this time to do report cards.  I always think that I’ll have more time at home and so I put it off.  But, the reality is that I don’t have another 8 hours when I get home to do school work.  What I’m really doing is procrastinating by not effectively using the time I do have during the day.  This marking period, I did use time during the school day and I learned, again, that I can get a lot done in 30 minutes if I focus my attention on what needs to be done.


(9) Do maintain my regular exercise schedule and fulfill family commitments during report card writing.  I’ll need the breaks and it will keep family life a little less crazy during an otherwise intense period of work.


(10) Don’t wait until the last minute to write report cards.  This bears repeating because it’s the one thing I seem to forget from marking period to marking period.  Once I finish all the comments and determine the marks for each area of the report card, I need to transfer this information to our online reporting system.  This doesn’t seem like it would take a whole lot of time but it does!  When I give myself enough time to do all of this, I don’t get sick and grumpy like everyone else around me.


What about you?  What new insights did you gain from doing your report cards this year?


Cross posted on Two Writing Teachers SOL

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Filed under report cards; reflection

Not in my class…

          "He's just bored, " she said. 
          "No. I don't accept that. In this class, he has lots of opportunities to challenge himself," I responded.  Although seemingly calm when I said this, I was seething inside. This is what I was really thinking: "Not in my class." 
     "Maybe he needs a nudge. Some kids need that, you know," she countered. 
     "Maybe," I responded.  This is what I was really thinking: "Maybe that would be true if he were in the class down the hall where all they do is worksheets day in and day out. But not in my class." 
     Then, as I'm wont to do, I started to doubt myself.  
     I sat down with Todd (not his real name) to talk about his math work. I wanted to get a better sense of how he thought about this particular problem since his thinking wasn't clearly evidenced in the explanation on his paper. Admittedly, the math in this problem was not very difficult for him. As we talked I helped him find a way to connect to this problem, and I challenged him to write his own related story problem.  He took me up on it right away.  Was it the one-on-one engagement that did it?  The individual attention that was missing?  When he didn't know something, I directed him to use the internet.  Now, he was hooked.  When I handed over my classroom to another teacher for my regular release time, he was still working away.  Later I heard that he  sought advice when his research led him to two different measurements - feet and centimeters - and was wondering whether he was allowed to combine the two.  Bingo! 
     Later I thought, "Maybe she was right. Maybe he has bored at times or at least not challenged enough. Maybe I dropped the ball on this one sometimes and now it's two weeks before the last day of school. What was I thinking?" And, almost as quickly, an internal dialogue with my two selves ensued. 
     Me: "But, in my class he has lots of opportunities to explore and expand his understandings." 
     Second me: "And, what did you do to ensure that he'd tap into these opportunities once you realized that he wasn't going to do it on his own?"   
     Me: "I made suggestions and he rarely took me up on any of the challenges I offered, at least not for very long." 
     Second me: "And, how long did you take before you tried something else?" 
     Me: "How much hand holding do I do as a teacher before I'm working harder than my students? Where was he all these months? Didn't he get the message that in this class we need to meet each other half-way?" 
     Second me: "He was probably reading his book or chatting with his friends and not listening." 
     Me: "OK. So, what could I have done to engage Todd in the learning of the classroom?" 
     Second me: "What could you have done to engage with Todd in his learning?"
     Me:  (Silence.)
     Ultimately, I believe it is my responsibility to make sure that my students are learning, and to do something about it when they're not.  I also believe that you can't make anybody learn anything they're not ready to learn or don't need to learn.  That's why it's so important to figure out what makes every child in the classroom connect to learning.  Of course, what a child wants to learn may not match the learning that the teacher has planned.  Although this poses a different kind of challenge, it's not an impossible one.  In fact, it's one of the things that invigorates me as a teacher.    
     So, did I do enough? Or, maybe my self-doubting is clouding my memory?  Maybe I didn't do enough of the right things, whatever those may be?  But, more importantly, how do I reconcile this experience so that I am better prepared to address a similar situation in the future?

Posted to https://twowritingteachers.wordpress.com/2012/06/12/the-weekly-slice-of-life-story-challenge-5/

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Filed under challenges, learning, next year, reflection, self-doubt

Teachers Write Summer Camp – Post #1

Below is my writing plan for this summer and the next school year – the first assignment of sorts for the Teachers Write Summer Camp started by Kate Messner.  I am making this plan public so that my friends and acquaintances can hold me accountable/responsible for following through.  So, every so often ask me how I’m doing with my plan.  Or, ask me what I wrote today.  Then, observe me for signs of hesitation or hedging.  Don’t nag though.  Just be supportive and nice 🙂

Writing plan for the summer and the next school year: 
1.     Write every day. (Summer and school year)
2.     Write for at least 30 minutes.  This doesn’t include 750words.com writing. (Summer and school year)
3.     Write first thing in the morning, if possible, or at lunchtime in school. (Summer and school year)
4.     Alternate between writing blog posts and short articles about teaching.  EdD research related writing has to happen every day. (Summer and school year)
5.     A weekly schedule might look like this:
a.     Monday – 750words.com writing; EdD research related writing
b.     Tuesday – 750words.com writing; short article; EdD research related writing
c.      Wednesday – 750words.comwriting; blog post; EdD research related writing
d.     Thursday – 750words.comwriting; poetry or fiction writing; EdD research related writing
e.     Friday – 750words.com writing; EdD research related writing
f.      Saturday – 750words.comwriting; free choice; EdD research related writing
g.     Sunday – 750words.com writing; SOL blog post; EdD research related writing
If I spend about 20 minutes on 750words.com writing and 30 minutes on the other kinds of writing listed above, then I’ll be writing for about 1 hour every day.  This hour can be divided into shorter chunks of time throughout the day.  I think 3 twenty-minute chunks make sense.  I’ll try this and see how it works out.  I will be blogging about this throughout the summer.  Check back for updates.  And, in the meantime, check out the Teachers Write Summer Camp    

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Filed under Kate Messner, teachers write summer camp, writing plans